Posts Tagged ‘Literature’

The story of Harry Potter as seen through the eyes of Fred and George Weasley. Such a sad end.

via @PotterWorldUK on Twitter

The BBC recently published an article about The 11 Greatest Children’s Books.

I thought it sounded interesting and decided to see what they’ve picked. The titles are supposed to be aimed at 10 years and under.

Their choices are as follows:

1. EB White, Charlotte’s Web (1952)

2. CS Lewis, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)

3. Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are (1963)

4. Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865)

5. Louisa May Alcott, Little Women (1868)

6. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince (1943)

7. AA Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh (1926)

8. Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (1964)

9. Ursula K Le Guin, A Wizard of Earthsea (1968)

10. Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle In Time (1962)

11. Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House on the Prairie (1935)

I noticed that these are all quite old and there’s no recent titles in the list!

Of the list, I have read only six – Charlotte’s Web; The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; Little Women; Winnie-the-Pooh; and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

I have heard of the others but never got around to reading them! Also, I’m not sure if I have read A Wizard of Earthsea as sounds familiar but I can’t be certain!

Of the ones I have read, Little Women I only recently got around to reading, and I don’t really count that as a children’s book, especially not for under 10’s!

I agree that other books are all great children’s books, but I think there’s a few which should be in there too – where is The Very Hungry Caterpillar?!

“But this is touching, Severus,” said Dumbledore seriously. “Have you grown to care for the boy, after all?”
“For him?” shouted Snape. “Expecto Patronum!”
From the tip of his wand burst the silver doe. She landed on the office floor, bounded once across the office, and soared out of the window. Dumbledore watched her fly away, and as her silvery glow faded he turned back to Snape, and his eyes were full of tears.
“After all this time?”
“Always,” said Snape.”


― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” 

This is one of the important scenes in the whole series and it was done beautifully in the films. It was a great portrayal of Snape’s love and anguish by a great actor, Alan Rickman.