Posts Tagged ‘Book Reviews’

Yesterday, I ordered some books from Amazon and they arrived today!

Special delivery

Special delivery

Now, before people start telling me I should support my local bookshops and all that, I must point out that the nearest decent bookshop is a good 15-20 minute drive away from my house and parking isn’t free, and the last few books I’ve bought have actually come from bookshops! I try to alternate between online stores and bookshops!

My main reason for buying online was needing to get some books for my mum’s birthday fairly quickly! I also have some birthday money to spend and I’ve been wanting some new books for a while!

These are the books I bought:

New books!

New books!

The top 2 are the ones I’ve bought for my mum, picked from a list she gave me. I actually want to read “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” because it is the continuation of the Millennium series by the late Stieg Larsson, although at the same time I sort of don’t want to read it in case it ruins the series! I’m not really sure what “The Silence of the Sea” is about but I may or may not read that once my mum has!

The 3 bottom ones are my choices! I like books about twins so “The Ice Twins” sounds fascinating. “The Red Queen” is one of these YA novels which is a fantasy that could be big like “The Hunger Games” or “Twilight” and sounds a bit like “Noughts and Crosses” by Malorie Blackman. “The Humans” just sounds like it could be funny and a bit weird with aliens in it.

I have no idea which book to start with but I’m looking forward to reading them!

I recently read “He’s Just Not That Into You” by Greg Behrendt and Liz Tuccillo.

“He’s Just Not That Into You” by Greg Behrendt and Liz Tuccillo (via Amazon)

It is essentially a self-help book on relationships, with letters from readers about various aspects of dating and so on, with Greg and Liz replying to them. It’s mainly from Greg’s viewpoint, so using a man’s perspective on problems usually dealt with by a women. I got this copy free with a magazine years ago and never read it. I thought it might be interesting so I started reading it this week while off work. It’s really quick to read but it didn’t really teach me anything I didn’t already know!

I’m not sure how they managed to base a film (of the same name) on this book but I haven’t seen it and don’t intend to! I would probably not read it again and I’m not sure I’d recommend it!

I recently read “The Marriage Bureau for Rich people” by Farahad Zama.

“The Marriage Bureau for Rich People” by Rufi Thorpe (via Goodreads)

The blurb reads:

“What does somebody with a wealth of common sense do if retirement palls?

Why, open a marriage bureau, of course. And soon Mr Ali, from beautiful Vizag in South India, sees his new business flourish as the indomitable Mrs Ali and able assistant Aruna look on with careful eyes.

But although many clients go away happy, problems lurk behind the scenes as Aruna nurses a heart-rending secret; while Mr Ali cannot see that he rarely follows the sage advice he so freely dishes out to others. And when love comes calling for Aruna, an impossible dilemma looms…

A colourful coastal town and contemporary marriage bureau prove a perfect backdrop for a splendid array of characters making sense of all sorts of pride and prejudice – and the ways in which true love won’t quite let go – in this witty and big-hearted debut novel.”

This is a great little book covering life in south India as Mr Ali opens a marriage bureau and helps people to find spouses. There are so many different characters, from the poorer members of society to the rich elite. Aruna is Mr Ali’s assistant and comes from a poor family who are trying to marry her off but struggling due to their poor status. She falls in love with a wealthy client but knows a marriage is out of the question due to the massive differences between their lifestyles and family status.

Mr Ali deals with difficult customers and easy customers, and seems to have a knack for sorting out even the most complicated situations. His wife, Mrs Ali, helps out occasionally and has her own ways of getting customers to cooperate. Their only problem is their son, who won’t settle down and get married but prefers to fight for rights and justice by protesting at demonstrations, much to his parents’ frustration. He is one example of not conforming to a society that sees certain behaviours as potentially damaging for that person and their family.

I never realised how complex a marriage arrangement could be: there are questions of marrying someone of the same caste or a different one, what benefits the couple bring to each other’s families, how compatible husbands and wives will be, how height and looks can rule out so many matches, and so on. There are so many things to consider but I feel like I understand it all a bit better now.

I give it 8/10 because it is a fascinating insight into life in such a complex culture and is a great read! I would read it again!