Book Quote of the Day

Posted: November 9, 2015 in Book Quotes
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

“Unlike the ink available in the late eighteenth century, which was made from squid, soot and turpentine, Shakespeare’s fluid derived predominantly from ground ‘gall nuts’, the product of the gall fly on oak trees. These would then be soaked in red wine, and mixed with iron sulphate and gum Arabic while being dried in the sun. A cut-down goose quill was the favoured writing tool, and the ink would be dried on the parchment or rough paper by dusting with a fine powder of ‘pounce’, made from pumice stone or salt; a letter would thus be judged ‘done and dusted'”.

– “To the Letter” by Simon Garfield

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